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TAKE FLIGHT WITH THE NATURE CONSERVANCY OF CANADA

Annual Report 2017-2018

In 2018, the Nature Conservancy of Canada joined with partners to celebrate a new conserved area along the Birch River in Alberta. This area has now created the largest stretch of contiguous protected boreal forest on the planet. Learn more about this conservation success or skip ahead to read our 2017-2018 Annual Report.

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TAKE FLIGHT WITH THE NATURE CONSERVANCY OF CANADA

A bird’s-eye view of 2017-2018

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Take Flight with the Nature Conservancy of Canada

A bird’s-eye view of 2017-2018

Report to our donors.

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New sights set on conservation.

It’s time to talk boldly about the tangible benefits nature provides, and the urgency and importance of protecting it. Nature is Canada’s gift to the world and we have an opportunity, perhaps more than any other country, to make conservation count. It will take young and old alike, working together, to protect the land, water and wildlife that is so unique to Canada.

Read 2017-2018 Annual Report
bird

Retired timber quotas allow for creation of protected park.

NCC negotiated the necessary agreements between the Tallcree Tribal Government and the Government of Alberta to retire the commercial timber quota along Birch River in northeast Alberta. The extinguishment of the timber quota allowed the Government of Alberta to create Birch River Wildland Provincial Park.

A collaborative effort of global importance.

The creation of the Birch River Wildland Provincial Park was made possible through the unique partnership and collaboration of Syncrude Canada, the Tallcree Tribal Government, NCC, The Schad Foundation, the Government of Alberta and the Government of Canada.

The largest stretch of protected boreal forest on the planet.

Birch River Wildland Provincial Park measures 3,330 km2 of conserved land. When added to neighbouring conserved lands, including Wood Buffalo National Park, this area now measures 67,000 km2 — creating the largest contiguous stretch of protected boreal forest on the planet.

Nearly one-third of the world’s boreal zone lies within Canada.

Canada’s boreal zone is part of a wide, green band that encircles the globe’s northern latitude. This biome is characterized by coniferous forest, primarily spruce and pine. Canada’s boreal is unique because of the large number of wetlands and lakes. Nearly one-third of the world’s boreal zone lies within Canada.

The Boreal forest plays a major role in regulating global climate.

Canada’s boreal forests and wetlands are a natural ally in regulating global climate. By absorbing and storing carbon, boreal forests act as the Earth’s largest terrestrial carbon sink, reducing the speed and the impacts of climate change.

Nursery for billions of migratory birds.

The boreal forest acts as a critical haven for billions of migratory birds each year. In fact, 325 North American bird species rely on the boreal forest for nesting, breeding and migratory stopover habitat.

A home to species of conservation concern.

The Birch River Wildland Provincial Park is also home to species that need large, intact and connected landscapes, some of which are listed as federal species of conservation concern — including wood bison, woodland caribou, peregrine falcon and whooping crane.

Birch River sets the stage for future conservation in Canada.

The creative and collaborative effort needed to retire commercial timber quotas in order to establish Birch River Wildland Provincial Park is a prime example of how NCC is working closely with partners to set the compass for future conservation.

Retired timber quotas allow for creation of protected park.

NCC negotiated the necessary agreements between the Tallcree Tribal Government and the Government of Alberta to retire the commercial timber quota along Birch River in northeast Alberta. The extinguishment of the timber quota allowed the Government of Alberta to create Birch River Wildland Provincial Park.

A collaborative effort of global importance.

The creation of the Birch River Wildland Provincial Park was made possible through the unique partnership and collaboration of Syncrude Canada, the Tallcree Tribal Government, NCC, The Schad Foundation, the Government of Alberta and the Government of Canada.

The largest stretch of protected boreal forest on the planet.

Birch River Wildland Provincial Park measures 3,330 km2 of conserved land. When added to neighbouring conserved lands, including Wood Buffalo National Park, this area now measures 67,000 km2 — creating the largest contiguous stretch of protected boreal forest on the planet.

Nearly one-third of the world’s boreal zone lies within Canada.

Canada’s boreal zone is part of a wide, green band that encircles the globe’s northern latitude. This biome is characterized by coniferous forest, primarily spruce and pine. Canada’s boreal is unique because of the large number of wetlands and lakes. Nearly one-third of the world’s boreal zone lies within Canada.

The Boreal forest plays a major role in regulating global climate.

Canada’s boreal forests and wetlands are a natural ally in regulating global climate. By absorbing and storing carbon, boreal forests act as the Earth’s largest terrestrial carbon sink, reducing the speed and the impacts of climate change.

Nursery for billions of migratory birds.

The boreal forest acts as a critical haven for billions of migratory birds each year. In fact, 325 North American bird species rely on the boreal forest for nesting, breeding and migratory stopover habitat.

A home to species of conservation concern.

The Birch River Wildland Provincial Park is also home to species that need large, intact and connected landscapes, some of which are listed as federal species of conservation concern — including wood bison, woodland caribou, peregrine falcon and whooping crane.

Birch River sets the stage for future conservation in Canada.

The creative and collaborative effort needed to retire commercial timber quotas in order to establish Birch River Wildland Provincial Park is a prime example of how NCC is working closely with partners to set the compass for future conservation.

New sights set on conservation.

It’s time to talk boldly about the tangible benefits nature provides, and the urgency and importance of protecting it. Nature is Canada’s gift to the world and we have an opportunity, perhaps more than any other country, to make conservation count. It will take young and old alike, working together, to protect the land, water and wildlife that is so unique to Canada.

Read Our Annual Report